Buffalo Head Rome Sentinel


LANDMARK FOR SALE — Known by patrons near and far for its large portions and reasonable prices, the 300-seat Buffalo Head restaurant has been put up for sale. The owners of the restaurant announced in October that it would close for the winter season but reopen in spring. The asking price, officials said, for the restaurant is $425,000.

Landmark Forestport restaurant goes up for sale

Published Feb 25, 2015 at 4:00pm

BY NICOLE A. ELLIOTT

Staff writer

FORESTPORT — The restaurant with the famous name derived from a local folk tale is now up for sale.

A “for sale” sign is now visible from the front lawn of the Buffalo Head on North Lake Road.

Known by patrons near and far for its large portions and reasonable prices, the 300-seat restaurant announced for the first time back in October that it would close for the winter season.

At that time, the restaurant’s owners would not return calls seeking comment. Only a message was left on the Buffalo Head’s voicemail stating, “We are now closed for the winter season, we’ll see you in the spring.”

A call to the restaurant Tuesday, however, indicated that it was a number disconnected or no longer in service.

Town Supervisor Parker Snead said he had looked over the property and that the parcel is ready for sale.

The former owners are out of the area now and no longer have ownership of the building, the town supervisor added.

“It will need some work but it looks ready to buy — it’s not stripped,” Snead said, of the restaurant’s current condition.

The asking price, the supervisor said, is $425,000 for the 9,500 square foot building, which sits on 4.78 acres.

The property has been listed by Gateway Properties of Upstate New York, Inc., of Remsen, which states the building is fully equipped with appliances and cookware.

The restaurant is steeped in local tradition and has long been a landmark in the town.

According to tradition, the Buffalo Head got its name from a story that dates back to when logging crews, often immigrants, were brought to the area by train during the work week and then brought back to the city for weekends.

In 1924, the wife of an Italian immigrant ordered her husband to take down a large stuffed buffalo head from their apartment. He brought it to Forestport, where he and his friends nailed it outside the train depot. Then when the immigrants, who spoke little English, were asked by the conductor how far they needed to go, they would simply reply, “Buffalo Head.”